I was supposed to be teaching statistics to undergraduate Fine Arts majors this semester but I’m going to Santiago to open a Latin American office for 7 Generation Games instead.

I’m a bit disappointed because even though when I was younger and got asked at cocktail parties what I did for a living, I would say,

I teach statistics to people who don’t want to learn it.

teaching Fine Arts majors would probably be a new experience.

I was planning on using Excel to teach that course. However, as I take a closer look at SAS Studio I think it might be feasible to use SAS.

First of all, it’s free for academics and you can use it on any device, including an iPad. I know because I’ve tested it.

Second, and more important for this group, you can use the tasks and do some real-life analyses with almost no coding.

For example, I want to know if the sample of students we tested on American Indian reservations who had a family member addicted to methamphetamine were, on the average, over the cutoff for depressive symptoms. On the scale we used, the CESD-C , the cutoff score is 15.

Step 1: Run the code to assign the directory with the data I made available for the course, for example,

libname in “/home/annmaria.demars/data_analysis_examples”;

Step 2: Under the TASKS menu on the left select STATISTICS and then t TESTS

selecting t-tests


3.  Next to the DATA field you’ll see a thing that looks kind of like a spreadsheet. It’s supposed to symbolize a data file. Click on that and a box will come up that lets you pick the directory (library) and the file within it. In my case, it is the CESD_score file.

selecting the data

4. Now that I have my dataset selected, from the ROLES menu  I select one-sample t-test.

5. Click the + next to Analysis Variable and select the dependent variable, in my case, this is CESDTotal

Data selected for one-sample t-tes

6.  Now click on the OPTIONS tab. Two-tailed test is selected as the default. That’s good, leave it.  The alternative hypothesis tested is usually that the mean is equal to 0, but I want to change that to 15. Just click the little running guy at the top to get results.

options for t-test


I showed the results in a previous post, the mean for my sample of 18 youth was 21 (p <.05).

What if we did an UPPER one-tailed t-test? Then my p-value is .015 instead of .03.

What if we did a LOWER one-tailed test? Then my p-value is 1.0.

To get these latter 2 tests takes about 5 seconds. All  I need to do is change the option for tails and click on the running man again.

Now, in just a few minutes, I have data under three different assumptions, from an actual study. My students and I can start discussing what that means.

Bottom line, check out SAS Studio. It may be more of an option for your students than you think.


Meet the howler monkey in Aztech Games


Speaking of baby steps for learning statistics, check out Aztech Games. You can play them in English or Spanish on your iPad. Learn statistics and Latin American history at the same time.


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